Great start to the CMBE

A group of some of the first CMBEs

The response to the Certified Management & Business Educator (CMBE) scheme has been more than we could have imagined. In just under three months since the scheme launched there are already CMBEs in nearly half of the UK’s business schools. We expect to reach that milestone in the coming days as interest from institutions in group subscriptions and applications from individuals continues to grow.

The scheme, which gives business and management academics professional status through continuous professional development, has granted the CMBE designation to educators in a variety of roles from Lecturers to Deans. The first Dean to become a CMBE was Professor Heather McLaughlin of Coventry Business School, who said:

“This new Chartered ABS scheme is breaking new ground in Higher Education by requiring a commitment to continuing professional education in learning, teaching and the student experience. It’s not just about being a subject expert anymore, we need to keep pace with changing pedagogies and new technologies. I will be urging staff in my School to demonstrate their commitment through the CMBE.’

Business schools interested in group subscriptions can contact Barney Roe.

We have also seen applications from academics from across the globe and to date the CMBE has been awarded to academics from South Africa, Ireland and France. Professor Nancy Armstrong, the Associate Director of Pedagogy from the triple accredited French school Grenoble École de Management, was the first international CMBE. Upon becoming a CMBE she said:

“Not only does the CMBE give me an international recognition for the initiatives in which I engage for my own personal and professional development, it also offers privileged access to networks, communities of practice and training programmes that are beneficial to our continuous improvement at GEM and HE in general. The world of Higher Education is highly competitive, but we are all working towards at least one common goal – offering the best possible learning experience to our students through high calibre approaches to pedagogy.”

There are also CMBEs from other parts of the university outside of business schools, who are teaching business and management in other schools such as Engineering or Manufacturing.

The CMBE is built on a set of professional standards and eligibility criteria designed to advance the quality of teaching and learning. Individual CMBEs make a commitment to these standards, including the requirement to undertake 40 hours CPD annually, and to our code of conduct. To oversee the scheme we are proud to have appointed a group of experts in quality assurance, professional standards and business education to the CMBE Professional Standards Board. The Board’s members are:

Independent Members

  • Adam Harper, Director of Strategy and Professional Standards, Association of Accounting Technicians (Chair)
  • Maggie Jones, Director of Qualifications and Partnerships, Chartered Institute of Marketing
  • Victoria Winkler, Director of Professional Development, Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD)

Academic members

  • Dr Paul Cashian CMBE, Associate Dean (Student Experience), Faculty of Business & Law, Coventry University
  • Dr Stephanie Morgan CMBE, Professor of Practice in Management, Kent Business School, University of Kent
  • Gillian Saieva, Head of Business, Finance, Accounting & Higher & Degree Apprenticeships, School of Business, Law and Communication, Solent University
  • Dr Tracy Scurry, Associate Dean for Learning and Teaching, Newcastle University Business School
  • Dr Liz Warren CMBE, Director of Teaching & Learning, Business School, University of Greenwich
  • Dr Toby Watson CMBE, Deputy Dean (Education), Durham University Business School

Representative of the Learning, Teaching & Student Experience Committee

  • Dr Adam Shore CMBE, Director Academic, Liverpool Business School

To find out more about the CMBE and to check if you are eligible to apply, click here.

Discussion

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